Giant Sequoia trees, also known as redwoods, are the biggest living things on earth. Heights of 300 feet and diameters of 30 feet are not uncommon. They can range in age from 2,000 to 3,000 years; many were living when Jesus walked the shores of Galilee. The largest specimen, the General Sherman Tree in Sequoia National Park, is 275 feet tall, has a diameter of 36.4 feet at the base, and has been estimated to weigh 2500 metric tons.

Author: 

Dave Yumen

Giant Sequoia trees, also known as redwoods, are the biggest living things on earth. Heights of 300 feet and diameters of 30 feet are not uncommon. They can range in age from 2,000 to 3,000 years; many were living when Jesus walked the shores of Galilee. The largest specimen, the General Sherman Tree in Sequoia National Park, is 275 feet tall, has a diameter of 36.4 feet at the base, and has been estimated to weigh 2500 metric tons.

These majestic redwood trees stand for centuries, surviving raging fires, violent storms, and fierce winds. It is fascinating to know that they have a comparatively shallow root system which makes their survival even more amazing. So how do they survive? They survive because they live in groves with their root systems intertwined. In other words, they support each other. They couldn't survive alone.

Neither can we. God knows our limitations. He sees our brokenness and doesn't expect us to be able to make it by ourselves. He knows we can't live the Christian life without help and encouragement. He wants us to know that He is right there beside us to encourage us to keep trying and to keep growing and become stronger. God often shows up through others, providing supporting friends to encourage us, to help keep us on track, and to keep us accountable—as none of us can make it alone.  

Learn the survival secret of the wonderfully interconnected Giant Sequoias. Do all you can to be in fellowship with other believers.

“Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for He who promised is faithful; and let us consider how to stimulate one another to love and good deeds, not forsaking our own assembling together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another; and all the more as you see the day drawing near.” Hebrews 10:23-25 (NASB)